Nice Gift Ideas photos

A few nice Gift Ideas images I found:

City of the Future: Second Class at Tam High
Gift Ideas
Image by fabola
Our after-school students at Tam High are building a City of the Future together, using arts and electronics to make a model of what our world may be like in 100 years.

In our second class, they designed the city they envision for this project and took turns discussing their ideas with each other. In their post-apocalyptic scenario, the rich are separated from the poor, who mine the sea floor and are oppressed by a government run by machines.

They also picked characters and objects for their city — some of which will be laser cut and printed in 3D. Next, they learned to solder stick figures out of copper wire, then made light circuits with LEDs and batteries. Finally, they added these lights to their futuristic homes, which they continued to decorate with gift wrapping paper, art supplies and everyday objects.

We have a great group of eight middle school students, ages 12 to 14, in this after-school class. Through this course, students will develop a range of skills, from creative expression to science and engineering (STEAM). And they will learn to create their own interactive art with simple electronics, in a playful way that makes learning more fun.

View more photos of our Maker Art course at Tam High:
www.flickr.com/photos/fabola/albums/72157666710348841

Preview their City of the Future in our class slides:
bit.ly/city-of-the-future-slides-tam-high-1

Learn more about our City of the Future course: fabriceflorin.com/2016/02/23/city-of-the-future/

Here is the course schedule for the Tam High students:
bit.ly/city-of-future-schedule-tam-high-1

Learn more about our Maker Art courses:
fabriceflorin.com/2016/02/14/teaching-maker-art/

NYC – Metropolitan Museum of Art: Virgin and Child Majesty
Gift Ideas
Image by wallyg
Virgin and Child in Majesty
1150–1200
French; Made in Auvergne
Oak, polychromy, gesso, linen; H. 31 in. (78.7 cm)
Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1916 (16.32.194)

This type of sculpture, with the Christ Child seated in the Virgin’s lap in a frontal pose, is known as a Sedes Sapientiae (Throne of Wisdom). These seemingly straightforward images convey complex theological ideas. Mary serves as Christ’s throne. Like his ancestors King David and King Solomon, Christ possesses wisdom and justice. He would have held a Bible, the divine wisdom that he himself embodies.

From the 1100s, Mary was increasingly revered as a nurturing, merciful intercessor. Such statues were used as devotional objects, and were carried in church processions. This image might have also functioned as a container for holy relics, since it has two cavities—one behind the Virgin’s shoulder, the other at her chest, probably added later.

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The Metropolitan Museum of Art‘s permanent collection contains more than two million works of art from around the world. It opened its doors on February 20, 1872, housed in a building located at 681 Fifth Avenue in New York City. Under their guidance of John Taylor Johnston and George Palmer Putnam, the Met’s holdings, initially consisting of a Roman stone sarcophagus and 174 mostly European paintings, quickly outgrew the available space. In 1873, occasioned by the Met’s purchase of the Cesnola Collection of Cypriot antiquities, the museum decamped from Fifth Avenue and took up residence at the Douglas Mansion on West 14th Street. However, these new accommodations were temporary; after negotiations with the city of New York, the Met acquired land on the east side of Central Park, where it built its permanent home, a red-brick Gothic Revival stone "mausoleum" designed by American architects Calvert Vaux and Jacob Wrey Mold. As of 2006, the Met measures almost a quarter mile long and occupies more than two million square feet, more than 20 times the size of the original 1880 building.

In 2007, the Metropolitan Museum of Art was ranked #17 on the AIA 150 America’s Favorite Architecture list.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1967. The interior was designated in 1977.

National Historic Register #86003556 (1986)

Best Wedding Gift Ever – Custom Thor Comic Book Cover
Gift Ideas
Image by glsims99
Years ago, when one of my dear college friends, Eric Nelson, was getting married…I came up with an idea for his wedding gift. You see, Eric’s favorite comic book hero was/is Thor. So, I thought, wouldn’t it be awesome if I could find a comic book artist to create a custom Thor comic book cover based on Eric’s wedding.

I went to a local comic book convention, found an artist…and he drafted this version of the cover. Then he created a full color version (which I sent to Eric and Heather as their wedding gift).

I still think, this is the best wedding gift I’ve ever given.

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