Girl Scouts help build rain garden – U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys, South Korea – 14 April 2012

A few nice Homemade Gifts images I found:

Girl Scouts help build rain garden – U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys, South Korea – 14 April 2012
Homemade Gifts
Image by USAG-Humphreys
Click here to learn more about Camp Humphreys

U.S. Army photos by Rakendra Moore

CAMP HUMPHREYS — “Rain, sleet, or snow, Earth Day is a go,” said Onsemus Smith, Chief of the Pollution Prevention and Compliance Branch of the United States Army Garrison Department of Public Works’ Environmental Division.

Indeed, despite the rain and cold, the Earth Day Celebration went ahead as scheduled, April 21, at Transformation Park and it was well-received by the attendees.
“I think it’s pretty cool,” said Pfc. Aaron Boutin. “It looks like everybody is having fun, even though it’s raining.”

“It’s good, because I’m here with my family and my friend and I got a lot of prizes,” added Daniel Ward, age 9.

The event started at 10 a.m. and was scheduled to last until 2 p.m. However, the weather created a different outcome. But there was still plenty of activity despite the truncated time frame. There were prizes awarded for homemade crafts created out of recycled material, clay leaf projects, trivia games, arts and crafts, and free food. The Army and Air Force Exchange Service donated gift certificates for photo contest winners.

The event was a partnership between Outdoor Recreation and DPW Environmental, and there were also volunteers from USO, the Boy Scouts, and the Girl Scouts.

“I think it’s neat that the kids get an opportunity to learn how to better the environment,” said Spc. Randall Shaver.

“I’m proud of our Girl Scouts and we prepared them on how to reduce, re-use, and recycle,” added Summer Young.

“We want the community to know what we’re doing as an installation to be good stewards of the environment,” Smith said.

When asked what Earth Day was all about to her, Victoria Caldwell said, “Being able to give back to the community and help preserve Earth for future generations.”

Private First Class Kevin Wade may have summed it up best when he said, “It’s cold, it’s wet, but a lot of people showed up. The outcome was bigger than I thought.”

Stable Block, Restaurant, Shop and Gallery – National Botanic Garden of Wales
Homemade Gifts
Image by ell brown
A visit to the National Botanic Garden of Wales. Near Llanarthne in Carmarthenshire, Wales.

At Millennium Square.

Stable Block, Restaurant, Shop and Gallery

Within the square Stable Block, you can find our Seasons Restaurant where homemade & fairtrade food is served using locally-sourced produce wherever possible.

The Stable Block also houses the Gift Shop and Courtyard Art Gallery which shows an eclectic programme of exhibitions reflecting the themes of the Garden have a look at our Art webpage to see what’s showing today.

Two hundred years ago, this stable block contained twenty-two carriage and riding horses, two large coach houses, a harness room, lofts and rooms for coachmen and stable boys. Each pen had a wooden plaque stating the horse’s name, height, birth date and parentage. When these horses died they were given honourable burials. Doves were also kept here, in the spaces within the brickwork, but now it is home to nesting house martins.

Grade II listed building.

Stable Block of Middleton Hall, Llanarthney

Location
About 200m NW of the Great Glass House of the National Botanic Garden. The site is on the axis of Trawscoed, the building which was a service wing of Middleton Hall, and its walled domestic yard. The rear yard is closed by a later stable block.

History
Middleton Hall stables were built to the design of S P Cockerell, the architect of the Hall. The Hall was completed in 1795 and the stables are probably contemporary. The service yard of the Hall and the stables were planned on one axis so that it was said to be possible to see from the Hall to the foaling yard behind the stables. A second rear stable building parallel to the original stables was added by 1853 on the same axis, with a little extension dated 1870.
Middleton Hall was ruined by fire in 1931 and demolished in 1951. The stables are much restored and are currently in use as administrative offices for the National Botanic Garden.

Interior

Exterior
Two-storey stable block of symmetrical layout in neo-Classical style with a higher pedimented centrepiece over the entrance. There is a crosswing at each end, projecting slightly to the front but boldly to the rear. At the rear of the main block is a lean-to roof on an arcade from wing to wing. Rendered and whitened stonework, low-pitch slate roofs with metal ridges, two brickwork chimneys near the join with each wing and a single chimney at the rear of each wing. The front elevation is a careful architectural composition of five units. Small high pediment over the entrance arch, set forward from, and above, two half-pediments. The latter are the forward returns of the main roof. The cross-wings are hip-roofed. The central carriage arch is round-headed with boldly outbanded voussoirs and quoins and an impost on the line of a bold string-course carried around the building. This incorporates the flat-arch heads of windows beneath the half-pediments. At the top of the entrance arch over its keystone is another string course, merging with the cornices of the half-pediments. Above this on the centreline is a blank panel and above the cornice of the top pediment are ten pigeonholes. The fenestration is much altered, but there are three remaining circular windows and three 16-pane sash-windows at front, and double casements above. Four-window side elevations with 12-pane sash windows to ground floor, and triple casements to first floor. Five low-elliptical arcade arches at rear, standing on bold square imposts aligned with the string course. The rear ends of the crosswings have two-storey blind arches.

Reason for Listing
Listed as a stable block of the Regency period and a design by a leading architect, S P Cockerell.

References
N D Ludlow, Middleton Hall Assessment (DAT Project Record No. 31018, 1995) pp. 9, 13;
Dyfed Archaeological Trust S&M PRN No. 30970.

This text is a legacy record and has not been updated since the building was originally listed. Details of the building may have changed in the intervening time. You should not rely on this listing as an accurate description of the building.
Notes:

About 200m NW of the Great Glass House of the National Botanic Garden. The site is on the axis of Trawscoed, the building which was a service wing of Middleton Hall, and its walled domestic yard. The

Source: Cadw

Listed building text is © Crown Copyright. Reproduced under licence.

Seen near the Mirror Pool.

Girl Scouts help build rain garden – U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys, South Korea – 14 April 2012
Homemade Gifts
Image by USAG-Humphreys
Click here to learn more about Camp Humphreys

U.S. Army photos by Rakendra Moore

CAMP HUMPHREYS — “Rain, sleet, or snow, Earth Day is a go,” said Onsemus Smith, Chief of the Pollution Prevention and Compliance Branch of the United States Army Garrison Department of Public Works’ Environmental Division.

Indeed, despite the rain and cold, the Earth Day Celebration went ahead as scheduled, April 21, at Transformation Park and it was well-received by the attendees.
“I think it’s pretty cool,” said Pfc. Aaron Boutin. “It looks like everybody is having fun, even though it’s raining.”

“It’s good, because I’m here with my family and my friend and I got a lot of prizes,” added Daniel Ward, age 9.

The event started at 10 a.m. and was scheduled to last until 2 p.m. However, the weather created a different outcome. But there was still plenty of activity despite the truncated time frame. There were prizes awarded for homemade crafts created out of recycled material, clay leaf projects, trivia games, arts and crafts, and free food. The Army and Air Force Exchange Service donated gift certificates for photo contest winners.

The event was a partnership between Outdoor Recreation and DPW Environmental, and there were also volunteers from USO, the Boy Scouts, and the Girl Scouts.

“I think it’s neat that the kids get an opportunity to learn how to better the environment,” said Spc. Randall Shaver.

“I’m proud of our Girl Scouts and we prepared them on how to reduce, re-use, and recycle,” added Summer Young.

“We want the community to know what we’re doing as an installation to be good stewards of the environment,” Smith said.

When asked what Earth Day was all about to her, Victoria Caldwell said, “Being able to give back to the community and help preserve Earth for future generations.”

Private First Class Kevin Wade may have summed it up best when he said, “It’s cold, it’s wet, but a lot of people showed up. The outcome was bigger than I thought.”

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